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Activities

1.     Objective of the Scheme:

Members of Parliament were being approached by their constituents, quite often, for small works of capital nature, to be done in their constituencies. There was a demand made by Members of Parliament that they should be able to recommend works to be carried out in their constituencies. Considering this suggestion, the then Prime Minister announced in Parliament on 23rd December, 1993 the ‘Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme’.

Under  the Scheme,   each  Member of  Lok Sabha  has a  choice to  suggest,   to  the concerned District Collector, works to the tune of Rs.1 crore per year to be taken up in his/her constituency.The Members of Rajya Sabha can select one or more district(s) from  the State  from which  he / she has been elected.    The nominated  Members  of Parliament, both Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha, may also  select one or more district(s) but only within the State / Union Territory of their choice.   The allocation per year per MP stands increased from Rs.1 crore to Rs.2 crores from the year 1998-99.

2.    Guidelines on the Scheme:

The Scheme is administered as per the Guidelines on the Scheme issued from time to time. These Guidelines give salient features of the Scheme, illustrative list of works that can be   taken up under the Scheme, list of works not permissible under the Scheme,  procedure  for  sanction and  execution of   works,  monitoring arrangement and procedure for release of funds, etc. A copy of the latest Guidelines issued in February, 1997 is at Appendix-I.

3.   Release of funds under the Scheme:

At the commencement of the Scheme in December, 1993-94, a token amount of Rs.5 lakhs per MP was released.   The funds  released per  MP  per  year  for the year 1994-95 to 1997-98 was Rs.1 crore. The allocation per MP per year stands increased to Rs.2 crores from the year 1998-99.

Upto 1996-97, funds @ Rs.1 crore was released without any reference to previous progress. For the year 1997-98, the funds were released in two instalments of Rs.50 lakhs each based on previous progress. With the increase in allocation, the funds for the year 1998-99 and 1999-2000 were/are being released in 4 instalments of Rs.50 lakhs each, again based on previous progress. As soon as the unsanctioned balance in respect of Lok Sabha constituency or Rajya Sabha MP come to below Rs.50 lakhs, the next instalment of Rs.50 lakhs is released.

Infrastructure and Project Monitoring Division

Introduction

The Infrastructure and Project Monitoring Division (IPMD), independent from planning and implementing agencies, collects at one place information about ongoing projects and provides management services to the Government for concurrent decision making and corrective action for efficient and effective management of projects. As a management arm of the Government,   the IPMD monitors projects costing Rs.20 crores and above under implementation by the public sector enterprises and major infrastructure projects  in the private / joint  sector  and  facilitates their smooth  implementation.   It  reviews the impact of  Accelerated   Irrigation  Benefit  Program (AIBP).  As a member,  it assists Public Investment Board (PIB) in the appraisal of projects, identifies causes and their   remedies for  time and cost overrun and assists the Government in fixing responsibility for cost and time overrun.

This Division has been successful in creating awareness about the impact of time and cost overruns not only on the project itself, but also on the national economy as a whole among the Managers in the public sector enterprises and also in top achelons of the Government and in reducing delays by bringing policy and system improvement in the project formulation, planning, implementation and monitoring. It has played a key role in the institution development, enhancement of project management practices in the country with a view to strengthening delivery of infrastructure projects for economic development of the country.

Major Activities of the Infrastructure and Project Monitoring Division

  • To bring out periodical reports,  review notes,  suggest remedial measures and facilitate solution of the problems of projects under implementation
  • To assist the Public Investment Board. In the case of new projects, the main job of the IPMD, as one of the Board members is critical appraisal of the state of preparedness with respect to the project  inputs  in  terms of  land   availability,   equipment deliveries,  feedstock and other linkages necessary  for the project completion and  its commissioning,  and the strength of the organisation / management team for implementation within the stipulated time and cost.  In the case of revised cost estimates,  the main job of the IPMD   is to analysis the causes of time and cost overruns with a view to learning lessons for future and,  if necessary,  fixing responsibility for time and cost overruns;
  • To assist  the  Committee of  Secretaries  (COS)  headed by Cabinet Secretary which reviews  the  on-going  projects  and   gives  direction  for  remedial  action.  The IPMD continuously apprises the COS of the constraints in implementation and action taken or initiated by various agencies on its directions;
  • To assist the Cabinet Committee on Infrastructure (CCI), set up under the chairmanship of the Finance Minister.   The Minister of  State (Independent Charge),   Ministry of Planning  & Programme Implementation, is a member of this committee;
  • To monitor irrigation projects covered under the Accelerated Irrigation Benefit Programme (AIBP).
  • To monitor private and joint sector infrastructure projects in Civil Aviation, Coal, Power, Petroleum & Natural Gas,  Mines, Ports, Roads and Telecommunication sectors costing Rs.100 crores and above.
  • To visit the project sites to identify critical and important milestones for monitoring the project, review   the  progress  of  implementation  of    projects,  and   hold  in  depth  discussions   with  the Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) and administrative ministries /departments in  order  to get  first  hand  knowledge  of  the problems and    to  initiate  facilitative  action   for resolving them;
  • To  assist  the  ministries / departments / public  sector   undertakings  in  evolving  suitable monitoring system for keeping a close watch on the projects under their control and timely flow of information;
  • To analyse the draft Memoranda of  Understanding  (MOU)  between   the Public Sector Undertakings and the Government of India and also assist the Adhoc Task Force and the High  Power  Committee to  make  the   MOU system,   particularly  with  respect  to  the implementation of projects, more effective.
  • To motivate the project implementation agencies to strive for excellence in the implementation of projects;
  • To carry out evaluation of the on-going  projects and  ex-post evaluation of the completed projects, on the basis of completion reports submitted by the PSUs with a view to drawing lessons for the future;
  • To organise training programmes in  the areas of Project Management, Computerised MIS, etc,  for the managers of the PSUs and the Government  officers engaged in the implementation of the Public Sector projects;
  • To conduct seminars/workshops on various topics in the areas of Project Management & related activities and to make use of the feedback from such seminars and workshops for strengthening the art of project management in the country.
  • To continuously review project formulation, appraisal, monitoring and implementation system and initiate action to bring improvements; and
  • To facilitate development of project management profession by encouraging institutions working in the concerned areas.

Implementation Scenario

As on June, 1999, there were 434 projects on the monitoring system. The anticipated cost of 434 projects is Rs.1,58,477 crores and the total expenditure incurred upto August, 1999 was Rs.67,719 crores. These projects are classified into 3 categories, mega projects (costing Rs.1000 crores and above), major projects (costing Rs.100 crores to Rs.1000 crores) and medium projects (costing Rs.20 to Rs.100 crores). The break-up is as follows:

  No.   Cost (Rs. Crores)
- Mega Projects   34 91,929
- Major Projects   170 56,160
- Medium Projects 227 10,358
Total: 434 1,58,447

Of the 434 projects, 11 projects are ahead of schedule, 86 projects are on schedule, 204 projects are running behind schedule ranging 1 month to 132 months with respect to their latest approved dates of commissioning, 189 projects have cost overrun of about 33% with respect to their latest approved costs, 131 projects have both time and cost overrun. The cost overrun in case of 204 delayed projects is of the order of 25%.

Implementation of Accelerated Irrigation Benefit Programme (AIBP)

        The AIBP was started by the Government of India in 1996-97 to provide loan assistance to the State Governments for carrying out activities on on-going irrigation projects which will accelerate the creation of potential for the benefit of the farmers in shortest possible time. During 1996-97, 50 projects were identified for Central Loan Assistance (CLA) under the scheme and against the target of Rs.500 crores, Rs. 500 crores were released as CLA. In 1997-98, 81 projects were identified and a CLA of Rs. 951 crores were released. During 1998-99, 103 projects were identified and Rs. 1119.2 crores were released as CLA. During 1999-2000, 116 projects have been identified with a target of Rs. 1642.7 crores as CLA. As on September, 1999, Rs. 590 crores have been released for these projects as CLA. The MOSPI does the conventional monitoring with a view to ensure effective utilisation of CLA and creation of potential thereof in shortest time frame. The potential created in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-1999 were 141226 ha, 272596 ha and 2015,88 ha respectively.

Monitoring of private sector infrastructure projects

The monitoring of private sector infrastructure projects has just started by the MOSPI. The objective of monitoring by a central agency like the MOSPI is to have an overall picture of the infrastructure development in the country and highlight the problems coming in the way of implementation with a view to impinge upon early solutions and system improvements. This will ultimately increase the pace of private sector investment in the infrastructure development of the country. As on September, 1999, the MOSPI has collected information in respect of about 100 major projects costing Rs.100 crores and above in power, petroleum, surface transport, mining, civil aviation and telecommunication sectors. The ambit of monitoring in the private sector would be increased to cover other sectors once a system for monitoring has been developed and made operational in the MOSPI.

Publications

  • Manual on Project Implementation, 1989
    (This is presently under revision.)
  • The Division prepares following Monitoring Reports:
  • Monthly Flash Report on Major projects costing Rs 100 Crores and above.
  • Monthly Exception Report on Major projects costing Rs 100 Crores and above.
  • Quarterly Project Implementation Status Report on all projects costing Rs 20 Crores and above.
  • Special Quarterly Report on Major projects to the Prime Minister’s Office in selected sectors

These reports are meant for Official use.

Press Releases

None at the moment.

Tender

The Division has floated a tender for pre- qualification of consultants and consultancy firms, the details of which are as follows:

Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation
Department of Statistics & Programme Implementation
(Infrastructure and Project Monitoring Division)

Pre-qualification Tender No. P-11010/35/99-PMD dated 22.7.1999

  1. Applications are invited from reputed Project Management and Information Technology Consultancy Organisations/Consultants to register with the Department of Statistics & Programme Implementation to take up assignments in the following areas:
    1.  Project  Planning,  Management and Monitoring,  and Infrastructure Performance 
      Management.
    2.  Design,operation & maintenance of computerised on-line or web-enabled or internet-enabled information management system, professional design of reports  evaluation of effectiveness  of  monitoring  system and  decision support system f    management of projects all  over the country.   This  will include selection / procurem    of  necessary    hardware  and software and training on usage of above systems.
    3. Design and establish an  ERP system for  project data communication and integration of multi-location project sites, which are using different project management packages and softwares  on  an on-line  or  web-enabled or internet-enabled  communication network.
      This will include selection  and  procurement of software  and   necessary  client  training.
    4. Application of Geographical system to map the location of projects and programs, their expenditure etc and provide necessary training to client organisations.
    5. Surveys   and  studies in   various  areas  of   project  management,   i.e.,   time   management, cost-control, quality management, human resource management,funding of projects and fund management,  communication,  tactical and strategic issues and their management,   inventory procurement  management,  organisation and organisation management, delegation of power, etc.
    6. Contract documentation, contracting systems, contract administration, management and monitoring.
    7. Surveys and studies in sectoral areas, such as, Civil Aviation, Coal, Fertilizers, Mines, Steel, Petro-Chemical, Petroleum and Natural Gas Power, Railways, Surface Transport (Roads & Ports) etc. The scope of these studies may relate to study of their existing capacity, capacity utilisation,  reasons  for  poor  performance,   conditions for  better performance,  aspects of linkages, related managerial and organisational issues and solutions,  development of system dynamics and forecasting models for infrastructure development and management.
    8. Undertaking   surveys,   research   and  evaluation   studies  in  project   and   infrastructure management of social sector and development programmes and schemes etc. The scope of the study may include the objective achievement analysis both in terms of target and quality, fund flows, implementation management, monitoring, review and control system etc.
    9. To assist or independently organise short-term training programmes, workshops, seminars, conferences etc. in project, infrastructure management and programme management.
  2. The applications may be submitted to the undersigned with the following details:
    1. Organisations brochure with full details of infrastructure, personnel and facilities available.
    2. Details of projects/assignments done in the area(s) for which the application is proposed to be registered.
    3. CVs of the resource persons proposed to be associated with assignments in the areas(s) of choice.
    4. Concept paper(s) on types of projects that could be taken up in the area(s) for which the application(s) is/are being registered.
  3. The application(s) should clearly indicate the area(s) for which the registration/empanelment is sought. If a consultancy organisation/consultant is interested in getting registered for more than one area, applications could be sent in the same cover superscribing the specification of the area.
  4. The application(s) may be sent to Shri J.L. Narayan, Joint Adviser, D/o Statistics & Programme Implementation, Sardar Patel Bhavan, 2nd Floor, Parliament Street, New Delhi - 110001 by the 30th September, 1999.

Forms for use of General Public

No forms have been prescribed for general public.

Links to related Sites of PSUs

There is no PSU under the administrative control of this Ministry.

MONITORING OF  PERFORMANCE  OF  INFRASTRUCTURE SECTORS

INTRODUCTION:

The economic growth of the country depends considerably upon the performance of the infrastructure sectors. Monitoring of the production performance of the infrastructure sectors is aimed at removing the bottlenecks in the way of their accelerated growth. In the existing scheme, the Infrastructure and Project Monitoring Division (IPMD) of the Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation (MS&PI) is collecting relevant statistics of production and productivity from the concerned Ministries/Departments and compiling it in the form of Monthly Reports. This division is entrusted with the task of monitoring of monthly performance of the countrys eleven industrial infrastructure sectors, viz., Power, Coal, Steel, Railways, Telecommunications, Ports, Fertilizers, Cement, Petroleum & Natural Gas, Roads and Civil Aviation, for submission, inter alia, to the Prime Ministers Office (PMO) and the Cabinet Secretariat. Certain identified parameters of production and productivity relevant to each of the 11 sectors are monitored with reference to their physical targets along with the achievements in the corresponding period of the previous year. Since every Ministry/Department is concurrently undertaking its own in-depth monitoring, IPMD is expected to play a qualitatively different role. The MS&PI immediately brings to the notice of the administrative Ministries/Departments any slippage’s or short-comings in the implementation of the schemes/programmes to enable them to take remedial measures for effective and meaningful implementation of the schemes/programmes to achieve the maximum possible output/performance. Moreover, being independent of the Planning Commission as well as the implementing agencies, the DS&PI alone is in a position to look at the entire system and to suggest improvements in a more objective manner.

PERFORMANCE DURING 1998-99 & 1999-2000:-

During 1998-99, all the infrastructure sectors have indicated mixed trends, Power generation, net addition in switching capacity of telephone exchanges, new net telephone connections provided in the country, production of cement, fertilizers and refinery have recorded moderate growth over the performance of 1997-98. During the first half of 1999-2000, (April – Sept., 1999), power generation, production of finished steel, fertilisers, cement, crude oil, refinery, cargo handled at major ports, railway revenue earning from freight traffic, net addition in switching capacity of telephone exchanges and provision of new telephone connections performed well and achieved a positive growth over the performance of April-Sept., 1998 ranging from 1% to 19%. The performance of the infrastructure sectors during 1999-2000 (upto Sept., 1999) is given below.
  1. Very Good Performance (above targets & positive growth)

    The performance achievement percentage in respect of the following infrastructure sectors exceeded/achieved the targets and recorded positive growth:

    S.No.

    Infrastructure Sectors

    %age achievement of

       

    Target for the period

    April-Sept.98 Performance

    1.

    Power Generation

    104.1

    107.4

    2.

    Railway revenue earning
    Freight traffic

    101.1

    107.6

    3.

    Cement production

    109.3

    118.8

    4.

    Cargo handled at major ports

    103.6

    107.9

    5.

    Fertilizers Production

    100.0

    107.1

  2. Good performance (above 90% of target and positive growth)

           

    1.

    Crude oil

    98.6

    101.0

    2.

    Refinery

    90.2

    119.1

    3.

    Finished steel

    92.7

    104.3

Power

The overall power generation in the country have indicated upward trend. During 1998-99, the total generation was 448.41 Billion Units (BU) which was 6.6% higher as compared to the generation of previous year For 1999-2000, a target of 469.00 BU has been fixed. During April-September, 1999, 237.26 BU power was generated which was higher than the targets and the achievement during the corresponding period of previous year by 4.1% and 7.4% respectively. While Thermal and nuclear have registered impressive growth, the hydro generation remained 2% lower as compared to the generation of corresponding period. The thermal generation in all the regions and sectors was higher while hydro generation remained lower in all the regions except southern and western. The thermal PLF during April-September, 1999 at 65.7% remained higher than the target and the achievement during the corresponding period of last year. The power shortage in the country during April-September, 1999 was 4.9% as compared to the shortage of 5.7% in the corresponding period of past year.

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NEYVELI   LIGNITE   CORPORATION ,   NEYVELI ( T.N.)

 

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NTPC

Coal

The coal production during 1998-99 was 290.03 Million Tones (MT) which remained below the targets and the production of previous year by 5.4% and 2.0%. The target for 1999-2000 has been fixed at 296.6 MT. During April-September, 1999, the production of coal was 128.4 MT which remained lower than the targets for the periods and the production of corresponding period of last year by 2.6% and 2.4% respectively. The shortfall from targets was mainly due to poor performance of Coal India Ltd. and Singareni Collaries Company Ltd. The production of these companies has been kept at a lower level because of less demand/off take from power and cement secotor.

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COAL  MINERS  IN  AN UNDERGROUND  MINE

Steel

Finished steel production during 1998-99 was 24.05 MT as compared to the production of 23.37 MT during 1997-98. During 1999-2000 (upto September, 1999), the production of finished steel at 12.45 Million Tones (MT) was 7.3% lower than the target but recorded a growth of 4.3% over the production of corresponding period of last year. The main producers (SAIL, TISCO and VSP) and secondary producers failed to achieve the targets. The capacity utilisation at 71% was higher as compared to the achievement of 69% during the same period of last year.

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STEEL  FOR  EXPORT

Railways

The Revenue Earning Freight Traffic carried out by Indian railways during 1998-99 at 420.91 MT fell short of targets marginally by 0.7% and also recorded a negative growth of 2.0% over the performance of 1997-98.

During April-September, 1999, the revenue earning freight traffic at 216.39 MT exceeded the target by 1.1% and achieved a growth of 7.6% ove the performance of corresponding period of last year. However, raw material for steel plants, iron ore for export remained less than the targets for the period.

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INDIAN  RAILWAYS

Road

This sector was brought under the monitoring of this Ministry in 1996. The Ministry of Surface Transport is providing data for monitoring this sector on half-yearly basis. During 1998-99, 815 KMS national highways were upgraded/strengthened against the target of 753 KMS. 57 bridges were rehabilitated/constructed against a target of 85 bridges. A sum of Rs. 1016 crores were spent against the provision of Rs. 2174 crores. During April-September, 1999, 446 KMS roads and 18 number of bridges were widened/strengthened as against the target of 364 KmS roads and 20 number of bridges. Rs. 418 crores have been spent on upgradation/strengthening of national highways against the budget provision of Rs. 700 crores for the period.

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Ports

A long coastline of India is dotted with 11 major ports which are managed by the Port Trust of India. The major ports handled 90% of the all India port throughput. During 1998-99, 251.68 MT cargo was handled at the major ports which remained at the level of previous year but fell short of targets by 2.4%. The coastal shipment of coal to the power stations and cement plants in the south via Haldia, Paradeep and Vishakhapattanam during 1998-99 was at 14.41 MT as compared to the shipment of 14.22 MT during 1997-98. During April-September, 1999, 128.61 MT cargo was handled at major ports which was higher than the target and the achievement of corresponding period of last year by 3.6% and 7.9%. The coastal shipment of coal during this period was 6.8 MT as against the shipment of 7.52 MT during April-September, 1998.

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SHIPPING-PORTS

Civil Aviation

The activities of Civil Aviation fell under three broad areas- operational, infrastructural and regulatory-cum- developmental. Domestic air services in the country are provided by Indian Airlines Ltd. and private airlines while international services are provided by Air India Ltd. and Indian Airlines Ltd. The infrastructural facilities are taken care of by the Airport Authority of India (AAI). The total number of passengers carried by the internation airports, i.e. Mumbai, Calcutta, Delhi, Madras and Trivandrum at 118.08 lakhs during 1998-99 exceeded the capacity of 104.7 crores. The passengers carried out by the domestic terminals of Mumbai, Calcutta, Delhi, Madras and Trivandrum together at 142.56 lakhs was less than the capacity of 216.0 lakhs during the year 1998-99. During April-September, 1999, international airports handled 58.15 lakh numbers of passengers as against the capacity of 48.99 lakhs. In the domestic sector, 72.22 lakh passengers were handled against the capacity of 104.39 lakhs. During this period, 152485 metric tonnes export cargo was hendled at 4 major airports and 76117 metric tonnes import cargo was handled at these ports.

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INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Telecommunications

India operates one of the largest telecommunications networks in Asia comprising over 23.5 thousand exchanges with a capacity of 226.5 lakh lines. During 1998-99, a switching capacity of 47.9 lakh lines was added as compared to 35.2 lakh lines in 1997-98 registering a growth of 36.1%. During 1998-99, 37.9 lakh new telephone connections were provided as compared to 32.59 lakhs provided during 1997-98 registering a growth of 16.4%. 37.05 thousand new village public telephones were provided during 1998-99 which remained short as compared to 42.85 thousand connections provided during 1997-98.

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Fertilisers

The overall production of fertilisers at 13.5 MT during 1998-99 remained 3.7% higher as compared to the production of 13.06 MT during 1997-98. The production of fertiliser during 1999-2000 (upto September, 1999) was 6.94 MT as against the production of 6.5 MT during April-September, 1998 registering a growth of 7.1%.

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Cement

The production of cement during 1998-99 was 87.84 MT as compared to the production of 83.16 MT during 1997-98 registering a growth of 5.6% During 1999-2000 (upto September, 1999), the cement production was 48.49 MT as against the production of 40.80 MT registering a growth of 18.8%.

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CEMENT INDUSTRY

Petroleum

The crude oil production during 1998-99 remained 32.9 MT as compared to the production of 33.86 MT during 1997-98 registering a negative growth of 2.8%. During 1999-2000 (upto September, 1999), the production remained at 16.41 MT against the production of 16.24 MT indicating a growth of 1.0%.

The refinery production during 1998-99 at 68.56 MT recorded a growth of 5.2% over the production of 65.17 MT during 1997-98. During 1999-2000 (upto September, 1999), the refinery production was 39.09 MT as against the production of 32.83 MT registering a growth of 91.1%.

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MONITORING OF TWENTY POINT PROGRAMME

INTRODUCTION

Alleviation of poverty and improving the quality of life of the people, specially of those who are below the poverty line, have been the prime objective of planned development in the country. A package of programmes comprising schemes relating to poverty alleviation, employment generation, education and health etc. called Twenty Point Programme (TPP) has been in operation since 1975. This package has been restructured twice in 1982 and 1986. The present programme, known as TPP 1986, has been in operation since Ist April, 1987 in its present form.

Following are the 20 points of the Programme:

  1. Attack on Rural Poverty
  2. Strategy for Rainfed Agriculture
  3. Better Use of Irrigation Water
  4. Bigger Harvests
  5. Enforcement of Land Reforms
  6. Special Programme for Rural Labour
  7. Clean Drinking Water
  8. Health for All
  9. Two-Child Norm
  10. Expansion of Education
  11. Justice to Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes
  12. Equality for Women
  13. New Opportunities for Youth
  14. Housing for the People
  15. Improvement of Slums
  16. New Strategy for Forestry
  17. Protection of the Environment
  18. Concern for the Consumer
  19. Energy for the Villages
  20. A Responsive Administration

MONITORING OF TPP-86

The Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation monitors, on a regular basis, the Twenty Point Programme – 1986 (TPP-86) being implemented by the State Governments, Union Territory Administrations and nodal Ministries/Departments of the Government of India.

FUNDING OF THE PROGRAMME

The 20-Point Programme forms an integral part of both the Plan and Non-Plan budgets of the State Governments/UT Administrations and Central Ministries /Departments. The outlays for different items under the programme are derived from the relevant Plan heads under State Governments/UT Administrations and Nodal Ministries/Departments at the Centre. Some schemes like family welfare programme are funded entirely by the Central Government, while other programmes like JGSY and Indira Awaas Yojana are jointly financed by the Centre and the States.

ITEMS OF TPP-86 Under TPP-86, there are 119 items identified for monitoring; 54 items are monitored on the basis of evaluatory criteria and 65 items are amenable to physical targeting/monitoring. Out of 65 items, 20 items are being monitored on monthly basis.

REPORT ON THE PROGRAMME

The Management Information System developed by this Department on the implementation of the programme consists of ( i) Monthly Progress Report (MPR) and (ii) Half-Yearly Progress Report (HYPR). The Monthly Progress Report covers achievement during each month against pre-set physical targets of carefully selected 20 items which have a direct and crucial bearing on the deprived and under privileged classes and upon those living below the poverty-line. Only 14 items, out of 20 items of monthly report, are taken for the purpose of ranking of States/UTs on the basis of their performance. Besides, a half yearly report on all items is brought out by the Department indicating the qualitative aspect of performance.

CUMULATIVE PROGERSS FOR 1998-99 & APRIL

1999-AUGUST Highlights of the performance for the period April, 1998 to March, 1999 are as follows:

While performance under all the 20 items can be seen in Annexure-I, 1999 it is important to mention that programmes like villages electrified, pumpsets energised, area covered – public and forest lands, bio-gas plants, drinking water problem, anganwadis, ST families assisted, SC families assisted, improved chullahs, tree plantation on private lands and ICDS blocks operational have achieved their targets during 1998-99. Under four items, namely, Economically Weaker Sections (EWS) houses provided, jawahar rozgar yojana, immunisation of children and Indira awaas yojana, the performance has been between 90% and 99%. In respect of primary health centres, the performance has been "Good", i.e., between 80%and 90%

 

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Annexure -II

The statement given below indicates the position of achievement under various items of 20 Points Programme for April 1999 - August 1999 and August 1999.

ALL INDIA PERFORMANCE : TARGETS FOR 1999-2000 ACHIEVEMENTS FOR APRIL 1999-AUGUST 1999 AND DURING AUGUST 1999.

Click here to view: All India Performance

 

September, 1999

Guidelines

on

Member of Parliament

Local Area Development Scheme

Government of India

Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation

 Sardar Patel Bhawan,

New Delhi

PREFACE

Members of Parliament are approached by their constituents, quite often, for small works of capital nature to be done in their constituencies. Hence there was a demand made by the MPs that they should be allowed to recommend works in their constituencies. Considering these suggestions, the Member of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme (MPLADS) was announced in the Parliament on 23rd December, 1993.

2. Under the scheme, each MP has a choice to suggest to the concerned District Collector, developmental works based on locally felt-needs. In the initial years, each MP could suggest works to the tune of Rs. 1 crore per year. Realising the usefulness of the scheme, Hon’ble Prime Minister Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee announced on 23rd December, 1998 that this amount was being raised from Rs. 1 crore to Rs. 2 crore from the financial year 1998-1999.

3. A variety of works have been taken up under the scheme which has contributed to the well being of the general public. Some very good works like construction of school buildings, community halls, library buildings, roads, hospital buildings drinking water facilities, ambulances for Government hospitals and reputed service organistions, installation of computers in Government and Government aided schools have been taken up under the scheme for the benefit of the common people.

4. On the suggestions of MPs, amendments to the guidelines were carried out from time to time. On the eve of constitution of 13th Lok Sabha, all these amendments have been incorporated to make the present edition self-contained and up-to-date. I do hope that this will be useful to the Members of the newly elected 13th Lok Sabha.

(Ram Naik)

Minister of State

Planning & Programme Implementation

New Delhi

Railways (Independent Charge) and

28th September, 1999

Home Affairs

       

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT LOCAL AREA

DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (MPLADS)

GUIDELINES ON SCHEME CONCEPT, IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING.

1.1    The Prime Minister on the 23rd of December, 1993 announced the "Member of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme" (MPALDS) in the Parliament. Detailed guidelines on the scheme concept, implementation and monitoring of MPLADS were issued subsequently in 1994. Pursuant to these guidelines, the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation has been issuing circulars, from time to time, on matters relating to operational details. Several Members of Parliament, based on their field experience, have raised a number of doubts and pointed out several difficulties as regards the implementation of the scheme. In the meantime, on account of transition from the Tenth to the Eleventh Lok Sabha, several issues were raised in regard to the modalities of funding and implementing works started/approved/ envisaged during the term of the Tenth Lok Sabha. After detailed discussions and taking into account the various view points and suggestions, the revised guidelines were issued in February, 1997. Thereafter amendments to some of the provisions of these guidelines have also been issued from time to time. These guidelines are issued after incorporating such amendments and in supersession of the earlier ones.

1.2    Under this scheme, each MP will have the choice to suggest to the Head of the District works to the tune of Rs.1 crore per year, to be taken up in his/her constituency. Elected Members of Rajya Sabha representing the whole of the State as they do, may select works for implementation in one or more district(s) as they may choose. Nominated Members of the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha may also select works for implementation in one or more district(s), but within one state of their choice. The allocation per MP per year stands increased to Rs.2 crores from the year 1998-1999.

FEATURES OF THE SCHEME

2.1    Each MP will give a choice of works to the concerned Head of the district who will get them implemented by following the established procedures, that is, he may be guided by the procedure laid down by the State Government subject to these Guidelines. In regard to works in urban areas their implementation can be done through Commissioners/Chief Executive Officers of Corporations, Municipalities, etc., or through the Heads of District concerned as per the option of the MPs. Implementation agencies can be either Government or Panchayati Raj institutions or any other reputed non-governmental organisation who may be considered by the District Head as capable of implementing the works satisfactorily. Engagement of private contractors is prohibited, wherever extant Guidelines do not permit such engagement. For purposes of execution of works through Public Works Department (PWD), wings not necessarily exclusively dealing with civil construction, but having competence in civil construction can be engaged-like for example, Public Health Engineering, Rural Housing Departments/wings, Housing Boards, Electricity Boards, Urban Development Authorities etc. The Head of the District shall identify the agency through which a particular work recommended by the MP should be executed.

2.2    The works under the scheme shall be developmental in nature based on locally felt needs. The emphasis is on creation of durable assets. Funds provided under the scheme should not be used for incurring revenue expenditure. The funds can also be used for purposes such as provision of service support facilities. However, they will not include any recurring expenditure like on staff to maintain such facilities.

2.3    It will also be appropriate if the scheme funds are used for partly meeting the cost of a larger work like for example for partly meeting the cost of a micro-hydel work only in case it would result in completion of the works. Where such part costs are met under this para, it should be with reference to clearly identifiable part of the work.

2.4    Sometimes execution of work, by their very nature, may span into more than one year. In such circumstances, funds under the scheme could be made available to the executing agency either in advance or over more than one year, phasing of execution of work being clearly kept in view.

2.5    The site selected for execution of the work by the MP shall not be changed except with the concurrence of the MP himself.

2.6    It should not be insisted that the land selected for execution of works should necessarily be Government land. It can be land surrendered by Municipal/Panchayat bodies, private trusts, private individuals, etc. The only care that needs to be taken is that the institution or the person surrendering the land has the title over it to so surrender. The District authorities should ensure that within the quickest possible time, the surrendered/transferred land is relinquished under the local land relinquishment laws. Locally recognized practices such as surrender of lands as per " No objection certificates" may also be considered adequate so long as they are legally valid and the assets created on the land shall be available for public use for which they were created.

2.7    An illustrative list of works that may be taken up under the scheme is presented in Appendix 1. A list of works which shall not be allowed under the scheme is presented in Appendix 2.

2.8    Payment of advances of any type to the contractors/suppliers under any work falling within this scheme is prohibited.

2.9    The Heads of districts should ensure that provision for maintenance and upkeep of the works to be taken up under this Scheme is forthcoming from the concerned local body or the relevant agency, that is, Government-aided institution, registered society etc.

SANCTION AND EXECUTION OF WORKS

3.1    In identifying and selecting works and giving administrative sanction for the same, the Head of the district should invariably get the concurrence of the Member of Parliament. Normally, the advice of the MP should prevail unless it be for technical reasons such as land selected for work not being suitable for execution etc. Where the Head of the district considers that a work suggested by an MP cannot be executed, he should send a comprehensive report with reasons to the MP under intimation to the Department of the State Government dealing with the subject and to the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation, Government of India.

3.2    As far as possible, all sanctions for works should be accorded within 45 days from the date of receipt of proposal from the concerned MP.

3.3    So far as technical and administrative sanctions are concerned, decision making should be only at the district level. If need be for the purpose of implementation of this scheme, full and final powers should be delegated to the District technical and administrative functionaries.

3.4    In case, a constituency fall in more than one district, the Head of the district who receives the money released by the Government of India shall make the required funds available to the other concerned district(s) in keeping with MP’s choice so that the Head(s) of such other district(s) could implement the works suggested by the MP in his district(s).

3.5    Since the works under this scheme would be implemented by different State Government agencies such as PWD, Rural Development, Irrigation, Agriculture, Health, Education, Area Development Authorities, Water Supply and Sewerage Boards, Housing Corporation etc. the Heads of the respective districts would be responsible for the coordination and overall supervision of the works under this scheme at the district level. The implementing agencies may not collect any administrative charges, centage etc. for their services of preparatory work, implementation, supervision, etc.

3.6    The Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation, Government of India, would have the nodal responsibilities for this scheme at the Centre. The Department concerned of the State Government will issue general instructions to all the planning and implementing agencies at the district level to co-operate, assist and implement the works referred to them under this scheme by the Heads of the districts. Copies of such instructions shall also be sent to the MPs at their constituencies and at their Delhi addresses.

3.7    The normal financial and audit procedures would apply to all actions taken under this scheme subject to these Guidelines, especially Guidelines contained in para 3.3.

3.8    Allocation per year under the scheme is for the constituency. Though there may be change in the MP representing a constituency, whatever may be the reason for such change, the allocation being for the constituency, continuity of action in implementing works under the scheme should be maintained. The Head of the district should play a coordinating role in this regard between the past and the present MP and the implementing agencies concerned.

3.9    When there is a change in the MP, for whatever reason it may be, the following principles should be followed, as far as possible in executing works:

  • If the work identified by the predecessor MP is under execution, it should be completed.
  • If the work identified by the predecessor MP is pending sanction due to administrative reasons beyond a period of 45 days from the date on which advice was received for taking up the work, it should also be executed provided the work is otherwise as per norms.
  • If the predecessor MP had identified the work, but it was not taken up for execution because of reasons other then those mentioned in the preceding sub-para, it can be executed subject to the confirmation of the successor MP.

3.10    In respect of Members of Rajya Sabha, the unspent balance left by the predecessor Members of Parliament in a particular State will be equally distributed amongst the successor Rajya Sabha Members in that particular State.

RELEASE OF FUNDS

4.1    Ideally it would be desirable that the MPs suggest individual works costing not more than Rs.10 lakhs per work. However, the limit of Rs.10 lakhs per work should not be too rigidly construed. Amounts higher than Rs.10 lakhs per work can be spent depending upon the nature of the work. (For example a single check dam to provide minor irrigation or water supply or a sports stadium may cost more than Rs.10 lakhs. In the case of such works higher amount can be legitimately spent).

4.2    Funds shall be released to the Districts each year immediately after the Vote on Account/Budget is passed. The funds released by the Govt. of India under the scheme would be non-lapsable. Funds released in a particular year, if they remain unutilised can be carried forward to the subsequent year without detracting from the allocation of rupees two crores per year per constituency. However, release of funds will be made with reference to the actual progress achieved in expenditure and execution of works. In other words, funds would be available in the budget to the extent of rupees two crores per year per MP and works will not suffer for want of provisions. At the same time releases will be regulated according to progress. The idea is that at any given time no excessive money should remain outside the Government treasury than is reasonably expected to be spent within a year. For example, if out of Rs.2 crore allotted for a constituency in a year, Rs.150 lakhs are spent, the balance of Rs.50 lakhs can be carried over for the year when this amount together with fresh allocation of Rs.2 crore (total of Rs.2.5 crore) would be the entitlement of the year and could be spent. But actual physical release of funds will be with reference to the amount expected to be spent. It should be seen, however, that unspent amounts do not excessively snowball into huge entitlements.

4.3    The release of funds by the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation will be done four times a year on the basis of the physical and financial progress of the works under implementation and further requirement of funds for works.

4.4    At the time of release of funds, the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation in consultation with the Heads of the concerned Districts will make an assessment of the funds required to complete the on-going works. Such requirements of funds will be met first and then only the balance allocation will be considered for new works. Instalment of Rs.50 lakhs in respect of an MP would be released once the balance amount, after taking into account the cost of all the works sanctioned (unsanctioned balance), comes to less than Rs.50 lakhs. The eligibility for the release of an instalment in respect of an MP will be decided on the basis of information furnished by the concerned District Heads in the format placed at Appendix-3 and 4 respectively, copies of which will also be sent by the District Heads to the concerned MPs.

4.5    Funds for individual works should be promptly released. 75% of the cost of the works can be released in the first instalment itself, the balance of 25% being released watching progress. To the maximum extent possible, release of funds should be arranged through the administrative authority available nearest to the work spot, like for example a Block Development Officer. The objective should be that release of funds also is made through decentralised administrative mechanisms already available on the ground and that implementing agencies have the quickest feasible access to such decentralised authorities.

4.6    In case the concerned MP is not interested in utilising the funds, he may write to the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation so that the release of funds is withdrawn.

4.7    Funds released under the scheme shall be deposited in nationalized banks.

4.8    Interest accrued on the funds deposited in nationalized banks may be used for the works approved under these guidelines.

MONITORING ARRANGEMENTS

5.1    For effective implementation of the works taken up under this scheme, each State Government/UT Administration shall designate one nodal Department for physical monitoring through field inspection and for coordination with the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation, Government of India. The Heads of Districts shall visit and inspect at least 10% of these works every year. Similarly, it should be the responsibility of the senior officers of implementing agencies of these works to regularly visit the work spots and ensure that the works are progressing satisfactorily as per the prescribed procedures and specifications. Likewise, officers of district at the sub-divisional and block level shall also closely monitor implementation of these works through visits to work sites. The Head of the District should also involve the MPs in such inspections and monitoring to the maximum extent feasible. They should also furnish monitoring reports once in two months to the MPs and the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation. A schedule of inspections which prescribes the minimum number of field visits for each supervisory level functionary of the implementing agencies may be drawn up by the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation.

5.2    The Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation would always have with it a complete and updated picture of the works under implementation. Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation would always have with it a complete and updated picture of the works under implementation.

5.3    Monitoring formats and other issues of details relevant to this scheme would be decided by the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation from time to time within the framework of the scheme.

5.4    The Districts Heads should also communicate information on the progress of works under the scheme on the Internet to the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation. Copies of such reports shall also be forwarded to the MPs. Software required for reporting on the Internet will be furnished by the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation. This will also facilitate instantaneous monitoring of the progress of the scheme constituency-wise.

5.5    The Chief Secretary or in his absence a Senior Principal Secretary/Additional Chief Secretary should conduct a meeting involving the Heads of Districts and MPs to assess the progress of works under the scheme at least once in a year.

5.6    Periodic teleconferences may also be organised, availing of the infrastructure and expertise available with the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). In these conferences to be organised by the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation, instantaneous contact could be established with the Heads of districts and other local functionaries to clarify doubts and remove bottlenecks. MPs also should be associated with such conferences.

5.7    In order to bring about continuous improvement in the implementation of the scheme, the Bureau for Parliamentary Studies and Training (BPST) may arrange training of MPs and district officials in batches, involving, and bringing about interaction with MPs.

6.1    In order that local people become aware that particular works have been executed with MPLADS funds, signboards carrying the inscription "MPLADS WORK" with the name of MP may be prominently erected at the sites.

6.2    In execution of works, MPs may face special problems/situations not envisaged and covered under these guidelines. Such cases may be taken up with the Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Ministry of Planning & Programme Implementation for suitable clarification.

APPENDIX-1

ILLUSTRATIVE LIST OF WORKS THAT CAN BE TAKEN UP UNDER MPLADS

  1. Construction of buildings for schools, hostels, libraries and other buildings of educational institutions belonging to Government or local bodies. Such buildings belonging to aided institutions and unaided but recognised institutions can also be constructed provided, however, that the institution be in existence for not less than two years.
  2. Construction of tube-wells and water tanks for providing water to the people in villages, towns or cities, or execution of other works, which may help in this respect.
  3. Construction of roads including part roads, approach roads, link roads etc. in villages and towns and cities. Very selectively kutcha roads can also be constructed where the MP concerned and the District Head agree to meet the locally felt need.
  4. Construction of culverts/bridges on the roads of above description and of open cut or tube wells.
  5. Construction of common shelters for the old or handicapped.
  6. Construction of buildings for local bodies for recognised District or State Sports Associations and for cultural and sports activities or for hospitals. Provision of multi-gym facilities in gymnastic centres, sports associations, physical education training institutions etc. is also permissible.
  7. Special forestry, farm forestry, horticulture, pastures, parks and gardens in Government and community lands or other surrendered lands.
  8. Desilting of ponds in villages, towns and cities.
  9. Construction of public irrigation and public drainage facilities.
  10. Construction of common gobar gas plants, non-conventional energy systems/devices for community use and related activities.
  11. Construction of irrigation embankments, or lift irrigation or water table recharging facilities.
  12. Construction of public libraries and reading rooms.
  13. Construction of creches and anganwadis.
  14. Construction of public health care buildings, including family welfare sub-centres together with the ANM residential quarters. Such buildings belonging to aided institutions also can be constructed.
  15. Construction of crematoriums and structures on burial/cremation grounds.
  16. Construction of public toilets and bathrooms.
  17. Construction of drains and gutters.
  18. Construction of footpaths, pathways and footbridges.
  19. Provision of civic amenities like electricity, water, pathways, public toilets etc. in slum areas of cities, town and villages and in SC/ST habitations, provision of common work-sheds in slums and for artisans.
  20. Construction of residential schools in tribal areas.
  21. Construction of bus-sheds/stops for public transport passengers.
  22. Construction of veterinary aid centres, artificial insemination centres and breeding centres.
  23. Procurement of hospital equipment like X-Ray machines, ambulances for Government Hospitals and setting up of mobile dispensaries in rural areas by Government Panchayati Institutions. Ambulances can be provided to reputed service organisations like Red Cross, Ramakrishna Mission etc.
  24. Electronic Projects:

    i) Computer in education project of High school/College

    ii) Information footpath

    iii) Ham Club in high schools

    iv) Citizen band radio

    v) Bibliographic data-base projects.

  25. Construction of Level Crossing at unmanned Railway crossing.

   

APPENDIX - 2

LIST OF WORKS NOT PERMISSIBLE UNDER MPLADS

  1. Office buildings, residential buildings, and other buildings relating to Central or State Governments, Departments, Agencies or Organisations.
  2. Works belonging to commercial organisations, trusts, registered societies, private institutions or co-operative institutions.
  3. Repair and maintenance works of any type other than special repairs for restoration/up-gradation of any durable asset.
  4. Grant and loans.
  5. Memorials or memorial buildings.
  6. Purchase of inventory or stock of any type.
  7. Acquisition of land or any compensation for land acquired.
  8. Assets for all individual benefit, except those which are part of approved schemes.
  9. Places for religious worship.

APPENDIX-3

FORMAT FOR THE PURPOSE OF RELEASE OF FUNDS UNDER MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT LOCAL AREA DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (MPLADS) FOR LOK SABHA MPs

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE UNDER MPLADS (UP TO DATE: )

NAME OF THE STATE:

NAME OF THE CONSTITUENCY:

NAME OF THE MP:

10th LS:

11th LS:

12tb LS:

13th LS:

NAME OF THE NODAL DISTRICT:

ADDRESS:

 

PHONE NO. WITH STD CODE:

FAX: e-mail:

1

Total funds received for the constituency:

FUNDS RECEIVED (Rs. In Lakhs)

(a) Funds received from the Govt. of India

YEAR

1993-94

 

1994-95

 

1995-96

 

1996-97

 

1997-98

 

1998-99

 

1999-2000

 

TOTAL

 

(b) Total amount of interest accrued on the funds

   

(c) TOTAL (a+b)

   

2

Total No. and cost of works recommended:

No. of works

Estimated cost

(a) By the 10th LS MP

   

(b) By the 11th LS MP

   

(c) By the 12th LS MP

   

(d) By the 13th LS MP

   

(e) TOTAL (a+b+c+d)

   

3

No. and cost of works sanctioned on recommendations of:

No. of works

Amount sanctioned

(a) The 10th LS MP

   

(b) The 11th LS MP

   

(c) The 12th LS MP

   

(d) The 13th LS MP

   

(e) TOTAL (a+b+c+d)

   

4

Total unsanctioned balance available with the constituency 1(c )-3(e)

 

5

Total No. of works completed in the constituency

   

6

Total No. of works started but not completed

   

7

Total actual expenditure

   

 

Date:

Signature of the Distt. Collector/Distt. Magistrate/Dy. Commissioner

Copy to

Shri/Smt.______________________________________.

Member of Parliament

Note:

(i) The next due installment of Rs. 50 lakhs is released only when the amount in respect of column No. 4 is reported as less than Rs. 50 lakhs.

(ii) The Nodal District Collector is required to furnish a consolidated report including the information pertaining to other Districts falling in the constituency where funds were transferred on recommendation of the MP.

(iii) Sanctioned amount is the cost of such schemes only for which financial sanctions have already been issued. Cost of schemes which have got only administrative approval (and not financial sanction) should not be reported as sanctioned in column No. 3.

   

APPENDIX-4

FORMAT FOR THE PURPOSE OF RELEASE OF FUNDS UNDER MEMBER OF

PARLIAMENT LOCAL AREA DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (MPLADS)

FOR RAJYA SABHA MPs

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE UNDER MPLADS (UP TO DATE: )

NAME OF THE STATE:

NAME OF THE RS MP:

NAME OF THE NODAL DISTRICT:

ADDRESS:

 
 

PHONE NO. WITH STD CODE:

FAX: e-mail

1

Total funds received for the RS MP

FUNDS RECEIVED (Rs. In Lakhs)

(a) Funds received from the Govt. of India

YEAR

1993-94

 

1994-95

 

1995-96

 

1996-97

 

1997-98

 

1998-99

 

1999-2000

 

TOTAL

 

(b) Total amount of interest accrued on the funds

   

(c) TOTAL (a+b)

   

2

Total No. and cost of works recommended

No. of works

Estimated cost

   

3

Total No. and cost of works sanctioned

No. of works

Amount sanctioned

   

4

Total unsanctioned balance available in respect of the MP 1(c )-3

 

5

Total No. of works completed in respect of the MP

   

6

Total No. of works started but not completed

   

7

Total actual expenditure

   

 

Date:

Signature of the Distt. Collector/Distt. Magistrate/Dy. Commissioner

Copy to

Shri/Smt.______________________________________.

Member of Parliament

Note:

(i) The next due installment of Rs. 50 lakhs is released only when the amount in respect of column No. 4 is reported as less than Rs. 50 lakhs.

(ii) The Nodal District Collector is required to furnish a consolidated report including the information pertaining to other Districts falling in the constituency where funds were transferred on recommendation of the MP.

(iii) Sanctioned amount is the cost of such schemes only for which financial sanctions have already been issued. Cost of schemes which have got only administrative approval (and not financial sanction) should not be reported as sanctioned in column No. 3.

 

SOLVING THE DRINKING WATER PROBLEM IN VILLAGES

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DRINKING WATER FACILITY IN RURAL AREAS

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EMPLOYMENT GENERATION UNDER JAWAHAR ROJGAR YOJANA

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HOME CONSTRUCTED UNDER INDIRA AWAS YOJANA IN RURAL AREAS

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TREE PLANTATION

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ICDS   BLOCKS  OPERATIONAL   AND   ANGANWADIS

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VILLAGE  ELECTRIFICATION AND PUMPSETS ENERGISATION

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IMPROVED CHULLAHS RURAL AREAS

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BIO-GAS PLANTS IN RURAL AREAS

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